The Scarlet Letter – Strep Throat

Alessia-blogDuring the cold months, a common illness is strep throat. Strep throat is caused by a bacteria and is most common in children aged two years and older. Don’t be fooled though: Strep can happen anytime of the year and at any age. It is spread through coughing, sneezing and close contact, such as sharing cups, utensils, etc.

Symptoms of strep are fever, chills, painful/swollen/red tonsils and throat, pain with difficulty in swallowing, swollen glands of the neck or under the jaw, headache, stomach ache, nausea/vomiting. Seeing pus or white dots doesn’t mean that it is strep; that can be seen with viruses as well. If you see red dots (petechiae) on the roof of the mouth, it almost always is strep.

Some kids never have a sore throat; they just complain of headache, stomach ache, etc. Others may have a red, rough rash that may itch. This is scarlet fever. It is essentially strep of the skin. The rash feels like fine-grain sandpaper and looks like a sunburn.sor ethroat

We recommend that strep be treated with antibiotics. In rare instances, strep may affect other parts of the body, such as the kidneys. Penicillin is the recommended antibiotic, though we may prescribe amoxicillin (it tastes better!). Zithromax and Omnicef are good choices for those allergic to penicillin.

It is a good idea to replace your toothbrush in one to two days after starting the antibiotic, so your child is not reinfected. Your child can return to school after being on the antibiotic for 24 hours and fever free for 24 hours.

Learn more about strep at http://www.rushcopley.com/health/healthwise/document-viewer/?id=hw54745

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Kyla Ababio, M.D.

Kyla Ababio, M.D.

Any parents of toddlers know that it is one of the most challenging phases of childhood. Your once non-verbal precious peanut who just wanted to be held, rocked and fed, now seems to only want to scream “I can do it by myself”, or “NO”, or “That’s mine!” and “Don’t tell me what to do!” That is their way of asserting control and declaring independence. During this phase they must also master control over their body functions including toilet-training, self-feeding, delayed gratification, language development, coping with frustration and social skills. Parenting is most challenging and rewarding when toddlerhood is done well. Here’s how to help your child with her tantrums from an article that I read in Parents magazine:toddler mischief

1. Be genuinely empathic to your toddler’s struggle. She needs your support. If she feels you’re flustered, disorganized, angry, or critical you will only escalate her rage and not be able to help her calm down. Your objective is to teach her how to settle herself.

2. Learn to talk reflectively with empathy in the moment of a conflict. You might say, “Mary (use her first name since pronouns are not mastered until age 4) wanted more video and Mommy said it’s bath time. Mary got mad. It’s hard to stop when you want more.”

3. Physically, walk your screaming child to her next destination, ie: to the bath to help her settle and calm down there. Children will escalate their yelling and protest, thinking you might change your no to a yes. If you are away from the location of the desired object your child will calm down faster.

4. If your child is out of control or has been aggressive (hitting, biting, scratching, or pinching), hold your child in your lap facing away from you to help calm your child. The holding provides a safe container so you can act as a receptacle for your child’s rage. Your child learns that she can be super angry and you do not attack, criticize, blame, or collapse as the target for their rage. Tell your child that when she stops pulling on you, you will let go. The moment her muscles relax, release her and praise her for learning to settle herself. You will not have to hold her too many times before you see a decrease in the frequency and intensity of her oppositional tantrums.

5. Do not lecture your child. Kids hate to be told what to do. Rather, after a tantrum talk gently with your child about what she wanted and was feeling. Together come up with alternative ways she can get what she wants without a meltdown. Always accept your child where she is. We are all on a learning curve. No one is perfect. We all want the same thing – to be acknowledged, validated, and accepted – flaws and all.

Just remember that this is just a phase and it too shall pass!

Pluggin’ Away

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Measles is Here

It is 12:31 a.m. I just finished nursing my son and I can’t turn my racing mind off. All I can think about are the families who tonight are “nursing” their children who have contracted measles. I can’t imagine the fear and sadness they are feeling as their child battles this preventable illness. I’m thinking […]

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Mommy “Hood”

Hello parents! Has anyone seen The Mother ‘Hood Official Video being circulated on social media? It is a really heartwarming ‘welcome to parenthood’ skit expressed in a unique way. In the video it shows groups of moms (and dads) who have different beliefs all meeting on a playground getting ready to “brawl” over their different beliefs […]

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